Archive for October, 2007

No Gutsy for me – yet

Five days to go, a release candidate is out and I felt like upgrading – then I noticed that bug #121653 (“fglrx breaks over suspend/resume”) is still open. I have a ThinkPad T60 with an ATI X1400 and I’m using the closed-source fglrx driver, so my setup is clearly affected by this bug.

As a solution I could switch to the free ATI driver, without 3D support, and with somehow degraded 2D performance. I don’t want that. Or I could just stop using Suspend-to-RAM. I don’t want that either. So either I wait until AMD fixed the driver, or I compile my own kernel with the SLAB allocator which is known to work with fglrx. I’m not sure whether the latter really is an option, it probably breaks other modules from the Ubuntu repositories, and I’m not keen on compiling every single piece myself. I’m running Ubuntu, not Gentoo. And the slogan “It Just Works” made me switch from Debian to Ubuntu…

Anyway, this shows once again how important open-source drivers are, and according to reports AMD is working already towards this direction. I will gladly install the open drivers once they are released.

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Firefox addon for web service interaction

I just ran into a very useful addon for Firefox: Poster. It opens in the sidebar and allows for sending basic HTTP-commands with custom headers and message body to web services. Very nice, especially when developing RESTful services.

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Attachments with SOAP

Just read an article on how to send (binary) attachments with SOAP.

One described approach is to include the data as MIME or Base64 encoded CDATA blocks. Another possibility is to attach the binary data outside the SOAP message (like it is done in emails). Finally the author talks about SOAP Message Transmission Optimization Mechanism (MTOM), which is supposed to fix the problem.

Well, MTOM has to be understood by the server and the client, which means we have to find a proper implementation etc. Why all this hassle? If it is necessary to send such data, it would perhaps make sense to think of using a Resource-Oriented Architecture (ROA) like RESTful Web Services. This doesn’t mean that it is necessary to switch over completely from a SOA to a ROA, but both techniques could complement each other in RPC-heavy systems. In other cases I would try to avoid using SOAP and focus on resources instead.

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